Towards more Tenacious Teamwork: On the Collaboration between the WPS and Small Arms Control Communities / Le contrôle des armes légères et le programme femmes, paix et sécurité : vers une collaboration renforcée

By: Kheira Djouhri, with Emilia Dungel and Callum Watson

Version française également disponible ci-dessous.

The Security Council has stated that:

the illicit transfer, destabilizing accumulation, and misuse of small arms and light weapons fuel armed conflicts and have a wide range of […] consequences […], including the disproportionate impact on violence against women and girls and exacerbating sexual and gender-based violence in conflict.

Noting the same dynamics, the small arms control community has recognized the need for the ‘equal, full and effective’ participation of women in the development of small arms control policies and programmes; greater consideration of the gendered impacts of small arms and light weapons; as well as encouraged the harmonization of national policies on small arms with those on women, peace and security (WPS).

Speaking of the latter, the Fourth Capital-Level Meeting of the Women, Peace and Security Focal Points Network is taking place here in Geneva soon. The Third Capital-Level Meeting of this network took place in Windhoek, Namibia in 2019, and one of its outputs, a communiqué to the Secretary-General, acknowledged the link between disarmament and the WPS agenda, including the trafficking of small arms. Therefore, one of the working groups for this Fourth meeting (gathered under the theme ‘Partnering for Change — Translating the Women, Peace and Security Agenda into Action’), will maintain a particular focus on harmonizing approaches to WPS, small arms control, and disarmament, while discussing the protection of women’s rights and recognizing women’s agency.

These harmonization undertakings build on long-standing efforts to deepen the collaboration between practitioners in the women, peace and security, and small arms control fields. Indeed much has been written about the convergence of these agendas — especially at the international level[1] — and how they can be mutually reinforcing. There are also promising existing examples of collaboration at the regional, national, and local levels.

To help other regions, states, or communities do the same, this blog post is the first of two focused on supporting actors from the small arms control and WPS communities gain expertise in each other’s fields. We’ll start with a short overview of the normative small arms control UN framework, then offer a few takeaways, before presenting a practitioner with expertise and experience in both small arms control as well as WPS.

Small arms control cheat sheet for those new to the field

There are four key UN instruments related to international small arms control. The below table summarizes an overview of each — as conceptualized in the Small Arms Survey’s Handbook Gender-responsive Small Arms Control: A Practical Guide, and notes gender dimensions — as outlined by the Gender Equality Network for Small Arms Control (GENSAC):

This overview is of course just a short glimpse of one possible place to start when engaging with the small arms control field from a gender context, and many more resources on the UN small arms control framework exist for those wishing to delve deeper (for a few of these, see footnote 1).

Perspectives and participation

An important consideration when working on the converging agendas between WPS and small arms control is to differentiate between incorporating a gender perspective and encouraging the meaningful participation of women.

The participation of women in policymaking processes is important, but their expertise, experiences, and inputs have to be reflected into the outcomes. Otherwise, it cannot be said that their participation is meaningful. A gender perspective, on the other hand, means applying a lens to understand how policies and practices impact the opportunities, social roles, and interactions of women, men, girls, boys and people of diverse gender identities differently based on their gender. In our experience, it’s essential that both take place — otherwise there is risk of having a balance of men and women at the table who don’t have any gender expertise, or, conversely, developing policies that seek to address the different gendered needs of the population without involving people of different genders in the policymaking process.

Moving towards meaningful participation as well as the incorporation of a gender perspective involves addressing underlying social norms — in line with States Parties’ obligations under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW).

Translating all this into practice may not be straightforward, but there are very concrete examples of practitioners with small arms backgrounds who have become experts on the WPS agenda (as well as the other way around).

Dual communityship: A pep talk

Ms. Regina Ouattara (She/Her/Hers) is the Director of Communication and Sensitization at the Permanent Secretariat of the National Commission for Arms Control (Commission Nationale de Controle des Armes) in Burkina Faso, as well as the President of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) in Burkina Faso.

Ouattara is a journalist and communicator by training, and worked on gender topics as related to development; environmental issues; and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in non-governmental organizations. In 2007, while she was the Director of Communications at the Ministry of Communication, Culture, Arts and Tourism, Ouattara was designated as the focal point with the defence and security forces, responsible for overseeing information exchanges and identifying opportunities for collaboration with other ministries. There, she became interested in small arms and asked to be transferred to that department in 2008, where she remained until being appointed to the national commission on small arms in 2012.

‘Men in security think that the arms issue is only a security issue, but it goes hand in hand with peacebuilding so the WPS agenda must also be promoted,’ she notes.

Training courses and education are important, Ouattara says, to give practitioners the tools they need to engage with issues meaningfully. She has carried out collaboration and trainings with both government entities and civil society organizations working on gender, to help them integrate the small arms (and improvised explosive devices (IED)) issue into their programming. These trainings include training-of-trainers, awareness-raising courses, and information workshops — with modules adapted to the type and purpose of the course at hand.

She points out that despite the calls for civil society engagement at the international, regional, and national level, there is not as much momentum as there could be. The trainings, Ouattara says, help put the role of civil society in combatting illicit small arms ‘back on the table’.

Still, as part of the trainings, Regina Ouattara encourages all participants — women, men, and youth — to deconstruct stereotypes around gender and weapons, by addressing some aspects of the culture.

‘The only thing preventing women from doing [more] are the socio-cultural constraints. [Overcoming these] requires a lot of courage […] as soon as one leaves the paths already traced, one is considered a rebel woman. But it is not being rebellious, it’s being progressive!’

As progress towards increased harmonization between the small arms control and WPS frameworks continues, watch this space for part two of this blog — on the WPS agenda from a small arms control perspective.

Kheira Djouhri is a project assistant with the Small Arms Survey, where she works with Emilia Dungel, communications coordinator and lead editor, and Callum Watson, gender coordinator.

This blog post is published as part of two Small Arms Survey projects: Gender-responsive Arms Control, and Women, Peace and Security (WPS) project — made possible through the generous support of the German Federal Foreign Office and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Switzerland, respectively.

The authors are also most grateful to Mme Regina Ouattara for her expertise and time in writing this blog post.

Blog posts are intended as a way for various Small Arms Survey collaborators and researchers to discuss small arms- and armed violence-related issues, and do not necessarily reflect the views of either the Small Arms Survey or its donors.

[1] See for example: ‘Converging Agendas: Women, Peace, Security, and Small Arms’ in the Small Arms Survey 2014 Yearbook; the Small Arms Survey Briefing Paper Ways Forward: Conclusions of the Small Arms Symposia; ‘Converging Agendas: Global Norms on Gender, Small Arms, and Development’ in the Small Arms Survey’s Handbook on gender-responsive small arms control; the UNIDIR publication Connecting the Dots: Arms Control, Disarmament and the Women, Peace and Security Agenda, the panel discussion Beyond the Buzz: Gender in Arms Control held as a side event to the UN First Committee on Disarmament and International Security; ‘WPS and Arms Trade Treaty’ in The Oxford Handbook of Women, Peace, and Security, the Gender Equality Network for Small Arms Control’s (GENSAC) issue brief, From Promises to Progress: Opportunities for action on gender responsive small arms control in existing international commitments.

Sources:

Pytlak, Allison. 2019. ‘Converging Agendas: Global Norms on Gender, Small Arms, and Development’ in Emile LeBrun, ed. Gender-responsive Small Arms Control: A Practical Guide. Small Arms Survey Handbook. (Available in English, French, and Spanish)

Chappuis, Fairlie. 2021. From Promises to Progress — Opportunities for action on gender responsive small arms control in existing international commitments. Gender Equality Network for Small Arms Control (GENSAC) Issue Brief.

Le contrôle des armes légères et le programme femmes, paix et sécurité : vers une collaboration renforcée

Auteur·e·s : Kheira Djouhri, avec Emilia Dungel et Callum Watson

Le Conseil de Sécurité a déclaré que :

le transfert illicite, l’accumulation déstabilisante et le détournement d’armes légères et de petit calibre alimentent les conflits armés, ont toute une série de conséquences néfastes […] sur la sécurité des civils dans les conflits armés, notamment des femmes et des filles, qui subissent plus que leur part de violence, et exacerbent les violences sexuelles ou fondées sur le genre.

Partageant le même constat, les acteurs chargés du contrôle des armes légères ont reconnu la nécessité d’une participation « égale, pleine et effective » des femmes au développement de politiques et de programmes de contrôle des armes légères et de petit calibre, et d’une meilleure prise en compte des conséquences genrées des armes légères[1]. Ils ont également préconisé d’harmoniser les politiques nationales relatives aux armes légères avec celles concernant les femmes, la paix et la sécurité.

Sur ce sujet, la Quatrième réunion au niveau des capitales du Réseau des points focaux « Femmes, paix et sécurité » aura bientôt lieu ici[2], à Genève. La Troisième réunion au niveau des capitales du Réseau, organisée en 2019, s’était tenue à Windhoek, en Namibie, et parmi les conclusions transmises au Secrétaire général par voie de communiqué, elle reconnaissait l’existence d’un lien entre le désarmement et le programme pour les femmes, la paix et la sécurité, notamment en ce qui concerne le trafic d’armes légères. Par conséquent, l’un des groupes de travail de cette Quatrième réunion se penchera sur le thème « Collaborer pour favoriser le changement : le programme Femmes, paix et sécurité en action » et veillera tout particulièrement à l’harmonisation du traitement des questions liées aux femmes, à la paix et à la sécurité, au contrôle des armes légères et au désarmement, puis entamera une discussion sur la protection des droits des femmes tout en mettant en lumière la capacité d’action de ces dernières.

Ces efforts d’harmonisation s’appuient sur des initiatives de longue date visant à renforcer la collaboration entre les différents acteurs qui interviennent sur les questions liées aux femmes, à la paix et à la sécurité, et ceux du contrôle des armes légères. En effet, la convergence de ces programmes a fait couler beaucoup d’encre, notamment au niveau international[3], tout comme leur capacité de renforcement mutuel. Il existe également des exemples prometteurs de collaboration, tant au niveau régional qu’aux niveaux national et local.

Pour aider les autres régions, États ou communautés à suivre ces exemples, cet article de blog — le premier d’une série de deux articles sur ce sujet — explore les manières dont les acteurs issus des communautés chargées du contrôle des armes légères et des questions liées aux femmes, à la paix et à la sécurité peuvent mutuellement gagner en compétences en s’inspirant de l’expertise de leurs pairs. Nous commencerons par un bref rappel sur le cadre normatif de l’ONU en matière de contrôle des armes légères, puis nous énumérerons les points-clés à retenir avant de dresser le portrait d’une praticienne expérimentée, aguerrie au contrôle des armes légères et aux questions liées aux femmes, à la paix et à la sécurité.

Aide-mémoire pour les novices en matière de contrôle des armes légères

L’ONU a instauré quatre instruments-clés relatifs au contrôle international des armes légères. Le tableau ci-dessous présente chaque instrument dans les grandes lignes, sur base du guide pratique du Small Arms Survey intitulé Genrer le contrôle des armes légères, et met en évidence leurs dimensions de genre, telles que présentées par le Gender Equality Network for Small Arms Control (GENSAC) :

Cette synthèse ne constitue évidemment qu’un bref aperçu des pistes qui existent pour aborder le contrôle des armes légères dans une perspective de genre. Il existe bien d’autres ressources sur le cadre normatif des Nations unies en la matière pour ceux et celles qui souhaitent creuser ces questions (voir la première note de bas de page pour en connaître quelques-unes).

Perspectives et participation

Les acteurs qui œuvrent pour la convergence entre les programmes pour les femmes, la paix et la sécurité et le contrôle des armes légères doivent être en mesure de faire la différence entre l’intégration des perspectives de genre et la promotion de la participation effective des femmes.

Certes, la participation des femmes aux décisions est importante, mais leur expertise, leur expérience et leurs apports doivent également se refléter dans les résultats, sans quoi on ne peut parler de participation effective. L’intégration d’une perspective de genre, en revanche, consiste à étudier sous un angle spécifique la façon dont les politiques et les pratiques influent sur les opportunités, les fonctions sociales et les interactions des femmes, des hommes, des filles, des garçons et des personnes aux identités de genre différentes, en fonction de leur genre. D’expérience, nous pensons qu’il est essentiel que ces deux aspects soient pris en compte. Sinon, nous nous exposons à un double risque : se retrouver avec des hommes et des femmes décisionnaires, certes en nombre égal, mais non spécialistes des questions de genre ou, à l’inverse, développer des politiques vouées à répondre aux besoins de la population en matière de genre sans impliquer des personnes de genres différents dans le processus.

Or, la réalisation des deux desseins que sont la participation effective et l’intégration d’une perspective de genre implique de s’attaquer aux normes sociales sous-jacentes, conformément aux obligations que les États parties sont tenus de respecter en vertu de la Convention sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes.

Si la traduction de ces principes dans la pratique peut s’avérer ardue, il existe en réalité des exemples très concrets d’experts du contrôle des armes légères qui sont devenus des spécialistes des questions liées aux femmes, à la paix et à la sécurité, et inversement.

Conjuguer les deux ambitions : un témoignage inspirant

Mme Regina Ouattara (Elle/Elle) est Directrice de la communication et de la sensibilisation au Secrétariat permanent de la Commission nationale de contrôle des armes au Burkina Faso et Présidente de la Ligue internationale des femmes pour la paix et la liberté (WILPF) au Burkina Faso.

Mme Ouattara est journaliste et communicante de formation. Elle a travaillé pour plusieurs organisations non gouvernementales sur les questions de genre dans les domaines du développement, de l’environnement, et de l’eau, de l’assainissement et de l’hygiène (WASH). En 2007, alors qu’elle est Directrice de la communication au Ministère de la Communication, de la Culture, des Arts et du Tourisme, Mme Ouattara est désignée comme référente auprès des forces de défense et de sécurité et se voit confier la responsabilité de superviser les échanges d’informations ainsi que d’identifier les possibilités de collaboration avec d’autres ministères. Elle s’intéresse alors à la question des armes légères et demande à être mutée dans ce service en 2008, où elle demeure jusqu’à sa nomination à la Commission nationale sur les armes légères en 2012.

« Dans le domaine de la sécurité, les hommes pensent que le problème des armes n’est qu’un problème de sécurité, mais c’est une question qui va de pair avec la consolidation de la paix, donc il faut aussi promouvoir le programme pour les femmes, la paix et la sécurité, » remarque-t-elle.

D’après elle, les formations et l’éducation sont cruciales car elles fournissent aux acteurs les outils nécessaires pour gérer les problèmes de manière efficace. Elle a collaboré à la fois avec les entités du gouvernement et des organisations de la société civile travaillant sur les questions de genre et leur a dispensé des formations pour les aider à intégrer la thématique des armes légères et des engins explosifs improvisés dans leur programme. Ces cursus comprennent des sessions de formation des formateur·trice·s, des cours de sensibilisation et des ateliers d’information, et chaque module est adapté au type et à l’objectif de la formation en fonction des besoins du public.

Mme Ouattara constate que malgré les appels à la participation de la société civile aux niveaux international, régional et national, de nombreux efforts restent à faire. D’après elle, les formations permettent justement de remettre la participation de la société civile à l’ordre du jour en matière de lutte contre le trafic d’armes légères.

D’ailleurs, pendant ses formations, Mme Ouattara invite tous les participant·e·s — femmes, hommes et jeunes — à déconstruire les stéréotypes autour du genre et des armes, en abordant certains aspects de la culture.

« Le seul obstacle à la participation des femmes, ce sont les contraintes socio-culturelles. [Pour les surmonter,] il faut une bonne dose de courage […] car dès qu’une femme sort des sentiers battus, elle est aussitôt considérée comme une rebelle. Mais ce n’est pas être rebelle, c’est être progressiste ! »

Tandis que l’harmonisation des programmes pour le contrôle des armes légères et pour les femmes, la paix et la sécurité continue d’évoluer, ne manquez pas la suite de cet article, qui évoquera le programme pour les femmes, la paix et la sécurité à l’aune du contrôle des armes légères.

Kheira Djouhri est assistante de projet au Small Arms Survey, où elle travaille avec Emilia Dungel, coordinatrice de la communication et éditrice principale, et Callum Watson, coordinateur des questions de genre.

Cet article est publié dans le cadre des projets du Small Arms Survey intitulés « Gender-responsive Arms Control » ( financé par le ministère fédéral allemand des Affaires étrangères) et « Women, Peace and Security (WPS) » (financé par le ministère suisse des Affaires étrangères).

Les auteur-e-s tiennent à remercier chaleureusement Mme Regina Ouattara d’avoir pris le temps de partager son expertise dans le cadre de la rédaction de cet article.

Ce blog a pour objectif de permettre aux collaborateurs et chercheurs du Small Arms Survey de discuter de sujets relatifs aux armes légères et à la violence armée et ne reflète pas nécessairement les positions du Small Arms Survey ou de ses bailleurs de fonds.

[1] Pour des raisons de concision, le terme « armes légères » se réfère aux armes légères et de petit calibre.

[2] Cet article est une traduction de la version anglaise « Towards a more Tenacious Teamwork : On the Collaboration between the WPS and Small Arms Control Communities » publié le 17 mai 2022, à la veille de la Quatrième réunion au niveau des capitales du Réseau des points focaux « Femmes, paix et sécurité » qui s’est tenue les 18 et 19 mai 2022 à Genève, Suisse.

[3] Voir par exemple : ‘Converging Agendas : Women, Peace, Security, and Small Arms’ (résumé disponible en français) dans l’annuaire Small Arms Survey 2014 ; la Note d’information du Small Arms Survey intitulée Des voies à suivre : Conclusions des séminaires thématiques sur les armes légères ; ‘La convergence des priorités mondiales en matière de genre, d’armes légères et de développement’ tiré du guide pratique Genrer le contrôle des armes légères du Small Arms Survey ; la publication de l’UNIDIR Connecting the Dots : Arms Control, Disarmament and the Women, Peace and Security Agenda ; la réunion-débat intitulée Beyond the Buzz : Gender in Arms Control qui s’est tenue en marge de la Première Commission de l’ONU traitant du désarmement et de la sécurité internationale ; le chapitre ‘WPS and Arms Trade Treaty’ de l’ouvrage The Oxford Handbook of Women, Peace, and Security ; et le Document d’information du Gender Equality Network for Small Arms Control (GENSAC) intitulé From Promises to Progress : Opportunities for Action on Gender Responsive Small Arms Control in Existing International Commitments.

Références bibliographiques:

Pytlak, Allison. 2019. ‘Converging Agendas: Global Norms on Gender, Small Arms, and Development’ in Emile LeBrun, ed. Gender-responsive Small Arms Control: A Practical Guide. Manuel du Small Arms Survey. (Disponible en anglais, espagnol, et français)

Chappuis, Fairlie. 2021. From Promises to Progress — Opportunities for action on gender responsive small arms control in existing international commitments. Gender Equality Network for Small Arms Control (GENSAC) Issue Brief.

--

--

--

Providing expertise on all aspects of small arms and armed violence.

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Recommended from Medium

All Lives Matter VS Black Lives Matter

Womxn, Womyn, Wom*n — What to Do?

No New Bodies in the Street

As Asians Face Discrimination, Attacks, Trump Fans the Flames

Addressing the Fear Factor of a Bully

The Nights that Define our Communities

Silence isn’t golden, speech is.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
small arms survey

small arms survey

Providing expertise on all aspects of small arms and armed violence.

More from Medium

The Family Structure Part 2

What Seems Easy Today….

The Top 8 Benefits of Having a Personal Brand You Didn’t Know About

4 Steps Will Help Black Women Share Their Bold Beautiful Voices

11 Black women of all different ages smiling. Some have on masks and others do not